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#Vote100: From suffrage to impostor syndrome

#Vote100: From suffrage to impostor syndrome

Activism, Education, Featured, Lifestyle
It has been 100 years since women could legally vote in the UK. To celebrate the centenary of this historic event, Voice of London is here to spread some girl love. Brief History Women were not allowed to vote in the UK up until 1918, which is when The Representation of the People Act was passed. In lights of the Act women above 30 with the required property qualification and all men above 21 were able to vote. While this was a huge step towards equal rights for women, it was only a stepping stone. There were two groups who fought for women’s rights. The ‘suffragists’ campaigned with peaceful methods such as lobbying, while the ‘suffragettes’ used more powerful, sometimes even illegal and violent protests to fight for equal voting rights for women. Their continuous fight resulted in
“What if men could menstruate?”

“What if men could menstruate?”

Activism, Featured, News, UK
“Menstruation would become an enviable, worthy, masculine event: Men would brag about how long and how much. Sanitary supplies would be federally funded and free.” Written in 1986, Gloria Steinem’s essay, “If men could menstruate” is as relevant today as it was then. Tampons are still taxed as a “luxury item” and one in ten young women (aged 14-21) have been unable to afford period products. In London, this number is closer to one in seven, Plan International UK reported this year. “Period poverty occurs when a person has to make a choice between food and sanitary items, between going to school or work and risking their menstrual fluid leaking because they can’t afford menstrual supplies,” Alice Walker-Mitchell from the charity Bloody Good Period told Voice of London. Girls in this s
Is the theatre industry really becoming diverse ?

Is the theatre industry really becoming diverse ?

Arts, Entertainment, Featured
Over the last few years, there have been several debates and discussions on making the theatre industry more diverse, in terms of its actors/actresses and behind the scenes. Lyn Gardner is one of the critics discussing the industries diversity with her most recent article, ' Theatre is embracing diversity but it's still not enough.' With the Theatre industry known for being owned by white impresarios, it has been highlighted that theatre audiences have acquired a specific demographic which consists of white middle-aged women and men. The theatre industry is trying to appeal more to a wider audience through plays such as Aladdin and the lion king which are known for having an ethnic cast, however, this still has not bridged the gap in bringing diversity to the stage. However, UK theatres...
Doing it for the culture: Marketing and P.C culture

Doing it for the culture: Marketing and P.C culture

Featured, Investigations, Radio, Specials
The recent Dolce and Gabbana and M&S ads controversy shows people are becoming more “woke” and are calling anything that is politically incorrect. With a generation that is outspoken and socially aware, millennials are social warriors. It is even easier than before to share opinions via social media and have it spread like wildfire. This power has enabled millennials to speak up about unacceptable behaviour. Case in point is Dolce and Gabbana (D&G). In mid-November, the Italian luxury fashion brand posted three short videos on Weibo, a Chinese social media network,  to promote its upcoming Shanghai runway extravaganza. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jfzy-_jDyeo&w=560&h=315 The videos show an Asian woman dressed in Dolce and Gabbana attempting to eat pizza
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