Monday, December 17The Voice of London

Beauty

Regret-ink it?

Regret-ink it?

Beauty, Health, Lifestyle
Body art has become progressively popular over the past years, but as the number of people getting tattoos increase, the ones regretting it do not fall behind. Nowadays, tattoos are perceived as a form of self-expression. Through body art, one can shape a version of their identity, culture, personal background or religious beliefs. Tattoos grant freedom to their owners when it comes to expressing oneself. In the past, some cultures used tattoos as a way to mark bravery, personal experience, or for slave-marking. Whereas others, used it to demonstrate wealth and status. However, today the modern reasoning for tattoos have enhanced beauty, individuality, rebelliousness and body makeover. They could also carry a message, for instance, a person could ‘declare’ their love for their partne
The era of lip fillers: Why are they so popular?

The era of lip fillers: Why are they so popular?

Beauty, Featured, Health & Fitness, Lifestyle
Cosmetic surgery is falling but the aesthetic procedures, from lip to cheek fillers are at a boom. Instagram influencers and YouTube stars are constantly promoting these trends among the millennials. Why is the aesthetic medicine so popular? The fillers and especially “lip job” isn't a recent phenomenon. Two years ago, lip augmentation was the most popular non-surgical cosmetic treatment, according to whatclinic.com. The surprise is that even after fillers moved from their 'trout pout' reputation to the modern working woman's' “improvement” of choice. Kylie Jenner, whose estimated net-worth is £30m, owns the company Kylie Cosmetics that provides a large selection of lip products. In 2015, she confirmed her lips had been artificially augmented with lip filler and that became a huge fact
Face to face: the rise of editing apps

Face to face: the rise of editing apps

Beauty, Featured, Lifestyle
“I don’t know what real skin looks like anymore” Chrissy Teigen spoke for a nation when she tweeted in response to the rise of face editing app Facetune. “People of social media: IT’S FACETUNE, you’re beautiful don’t compare yourself to others ok” she continued.   When The British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS) revealed the results of their 2017 audit, they made the claim that facial surgeries are falling in response to editing apps. They’re not wrong, editing app giant Facetune has been downloaded over 20 million times according to The Guardian. Since social media has become the norm, people are wanting to look the best that they possibly can online, and apps such as Facetune and Perfect 365 allow this to happen. With the chance to shrink your face, edit your
My Blackness is not for sale: ‘Blackfishing’ another form of cultural appropriation

My Blackness is not for sale: ‘Blackfishing’ another form of cultural appropriation

Beauty, culture, Investigations, Specials
The social media phenomenon of white people posing as black, shows how the culture and look of people of colour are seen as a commodity. It has some people on Twitter in an uproar - some calling it “blackfishing”. A Twitter thread was created calling out Instagram influencers who are allegedly blackfishing. https://twitter.com/WannasWorld/status/1059989829486690304 https://twitter.com/WannasWorld/status/1060189184202235905 The tweets highlight the frustration people have with these influencers - they are capitalising on black features when in fact, they are white. But it’s disheartening for Black women, such as model and blogger Lauren Campbell who competes with white counterparts. “As someone who’s in the industry, it’s frustrating because those girls tend to have thous
-->