Wednesday, October 17The Voice of London

Tag: cinema

The most comfortable cinema experience ever?

The most comfortable cinema experience ever?

Entertainment, Film & TV
Words & images: Joanne Clark | Subbing: Bernadette Galbraith Independent cinemas are dotted all around London, but have you ever been to one? I spoke to the cinema manager of one of the newest (and oldest) independent cinemas in the city. Growing up, going to the cinema was something my family did fairly regularly, although it wasn't until I grew older that my love for cinema really developed. Sometimes we would go to the Genesis Cinema in Stepney, and on special occasions, we would go to the premiere Odeon Cinema in Leicester Square. I have a fond memory of watching one of the earlier Harry Potter films in the huge premiere screen, and feeling like I was somewhere particularly incredible. This summer, I spent half of my life in the cinema, watching new releases and taking adv...
What’s left after you’re gone? Nothing much, states this Japanese photographer

What’s left after you’re gone? Nothing much, states this Japanese photographer

Entertainment, Exhibition, photography
Words and pictures: Marija Tomsone | Subbing: Isabella Dawe As Serbian poet and philosopher Dejan Stojanovic once said: “Absolute equals nothingness”. We are not sure this quote was the source for inspiration behind this particular exhibition, but it definitely made us think of it. The Voice of London Entertainment presents: Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Theatre Series within his collection of photographic works named Snow White. Hiroshi Sugimoto is an award-winning Japanese photographer, who has his own recognizable style. He is the creator of the catalogue made of a number of photographic series, every one of which has similar themes and features. This year Sugimoto brought his Theatre Series - a collection where he captures drive-in, abandoned and Italian opera theatres. “What’s so special abou
What would it be like if Paddington Bear came to London now?

What would it be like if Paddington Bear came to London now?

Entertainment
Words: Kiera Chapman | Subbing: Bernadette Galbraith Imagine filling up your dog's food bowl and hearing a bark from behind. Your adorable wet, wagging creature huffs, “Not the bloody turkey again. I’m feeling ice cream. I SAW that Asda delivery. I will be climbing the walls if I do not get my Walls.” If animals could talk, I imagine this to be one of the many sentences they would say. The world has a habit of salvaging comfort in talking animals. From Garfield to Donkey - from lasagne to making waffles - something is reassuring in the scrambled movements of furry lips, despite the fact they shouldn’t be moving at all. Paddington climbed out of Michael Bond's novels and graced our screens for the first time in 2014 - yanking toothbrushes from ears and scrambling about the National
The evolution of British horror films

The evolution of British horror films

Entertainment
Words: Claudia Jackson | Subbing: Tracey Popoola Speaking to horror expert Darrell Buxton, we look at the changes the British horror films have seen from the very beginning to today's slashers and freight-fueled films. British horror films are known to break genre boundaries. In 1973 The Wicker Man shocked audiences with an eerily unsettling horror set in broad daylight. Before that, in 1960 Peeping Tom was one of Britain’s first glimpses at the now famed slasher. Although It is tricky to pin point when horror films first made a splash in Britain, they can be dated back to as the early 1900’s with films like The Doll’s Revenge (1907) which started a horror trend that still dominates the genre. Today, Tomas Alfredson’s Nordic-noir nightmare The Snowman arrives in cinemas. But the fi
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