Wednesday, December 19The Voice of London

Sport

The London Stadium: West Ham’s home a disaster from the starting blocks

The London Stadium: West Ham’s home a disaster from the starting blocks

Football, Sport
A legacy, a dream, a promise. The three words that were endlessly spouted by Mayor and owners when West Ham successfully bid to become the new tenants of the then named Olympic Stadium. Six years on, the legacy is in tatters, the dream is all but dead and the promises unfulfilled. This discontent that has raged surrounding the London Stadium has been fuelled by what is a complete mismanagement from organisations and hierarchy’s ever since the end of the Olympics. The squabbles between both West Ham and London Legacy Development Corporation have affected both taxpayer and fans in what has been seen as one of the most expensive flops in a generation, and has killed the identity of club. When you think of an away day to The Hammers images of Green Street start swarming the mind.
Upton Park and life after the Boleyn Ground

Upton Park and life after the Boleyn Ground

Football, Sport
The chorus of cockney natter and shuffling of claret draped bodies had been a staple ingredient of East End charm for 112 years. The epicentre was the Boleyn Ground, but two and a half years since the club moved to Stratford, Upton Park has been left astray, now on the periphery of a football club it once called home. West Ham United’s move to the London Stadium had a clear objective- enhance the club brand, attract better players and compete for European football. “It’s a major part of our strategy that West Ham move to the Olympic Stadium” David Sullivan told reporters upon his arrival as club co-owner in 2010. And the idea didn’t provoke the level of disdain from fans that it has now. It did however, create worry in Upton Park. The Boleyn Tavern is arguably the world’s most fam
What is Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and why is it so popular today?

What is Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and why is it so popular today?

MMA, Sport, UFC
Just like any subculture, some sports remain in relative obscurity for years before breaking into the mainstream. That is also the case with Brazilian jiu-jitsu. The Voice of London went to talk to Geoffrey Sautner, an instructor in several Brazilian jiu-jitsu academies across London. In our interview, he reveals how and where jiu-jitsu formed and why it has managed to become so popular today. Jiu-jitsu is a grappling-based martial art that has deep roots in Japan but was later modified in Brazil. This niche martial art came to prominence during the first-ever Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) event back in 1993. One of the creators of the event was Brazilian martial artist Rorion Gracie. The event was not the first of its kind, but at the time it was a precedent for Americ...
Banana skins and abusive chants: football is still tainted by racism at all levels.

Banana skins and abusive chants: football is still tainted by racism at all levels.

Featured, Football, Sport
Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang knows better than most that your skin colour is of irrelevance when you've sent your fans into a state of limb flailing ecstasy with a goal, especially if it's against your local rivals. That is until a banana skin lands in close proximity of your celebrations.  Suddenly your complexion is the story, not your football. This act of racial abuse came days after an ITV documentary called 'Out of Their Skin', in which Ian Wright explored the journey through football of Viv Anderson and Cyrille Regis. Just as British football was collectively commending its progress since Regis and Richards received monkey chants in the in the 70's and 80's, one Tottenham fan at the Emirates reminded us not to get complacent. This is the kind of overt racism that was commonplace
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