Wednesday, December 13The Voice of London

RYP Recordings Presents: Foam, Tsuki & Goodbye Brighton

Cerys, from our Voice of London Music team, ventured down to The Monarch in Camden to witness RYP Recordings latest gig on Wednesday night. The line up consisted of a mix of soul, blues, grunge and alt rock, allowing the night to be engulfed in a haze of reverb and a vast range of vocals, sweeping into the packed out pub in the heart of Camden.

Words: Cerys Kenneally, Subeditor: Mattia Bosio

 

Foam

Foam were the first band to take to the stage. The grungy London four-piece have yet to reveal music to the Internet world, having only formed in the past month or so. Despite this, Foam made their first ever gig a memorable one.

Foam performing. Credit: Cerys Kenneally
Foam performing. Credit: Cerys Kenneally

Foam made the stage their own, showing no anxiety for their first live concert considering the fairly large crowd. With a set-list created in front of my very own eyes, it was admirable to witness the ‘on-the-spot’ creativity from Foam’s frontman.

Their only track accessible to the public is a teaser of their song “Lazy”. Live, the song swerved through Strokes-esque riffs, enhancing the scratchy vocals and grungy sound while repeating: “Why does it matter?”

FOAM performing their first ever gig. Credit: Cerys Kenneally
FOAM performing their first ever gig. Credit: Cerys Kenneally

Whilst performing, Foam were in front of the bustling Camden night. With buses and pedestrians screaming past, the pace of Foam’s set was elaborated into an energetic, electric haze of grungy-goodness.

The combination of the twangy guitars and the persistent drums enlightened Foam’s sound, bearing witness to influences like Nirvana and Pavement, reeling from 90’s alt rock to a fuzzy revival, and recreation of their infectious sound.

 

Tsuki

Following the admirable, indie-resurrecting set from Foam, Tsuki were up next. Full of grungy, psychedelic sounds, the five-piece mesmerised the audience with their melodies, allowing the front-woman to add an angelic tone to their dark sound.

Tsuki @ The Monarch, Camden. Credit: Cerys Kenneally
Tsuki @ The Monarch, Camden. Credit: Cerys Kenneally

Filled with seductive vocals and billowing basslines, Tsuki created a magical performance filled with impressive intervals of elegant instrumentals, similar to that of the anonymous group GOAT, and a similar, progressive synth sound to Wampire.

Tsuki created a whirlwind of wild music, recreating a dark energy reminiscent of No Doubt and Warpaint, plunging into the worldly sound of girl-power.

Tsuki from the crowd. Credit: Cerys Kenneally
Tsuki from the crowd. Credit: Cerys Kenneally

 

Goodbye Brighton

Goodbye Brighton were the most surprising artists of the evening. Westminster’s own four-piece performed tracks bearing influence to early soul and blues musicians, allowing front-woman Mia’s vocals to overwhelm the funky instrumentals.

Frtont-woman Mia from Goodbye Brighton. Credit: Cerys kenneally
Frtont-woman Mia from Goodbye Brighton. Credit: Cerys kenneally

As a collaborative, Goodbye Brighton were, without a doubt, the strongest group. The sheer sophistication of the blues-infused melodies allowed room for Mia’s superb vocals to silence the whole room.

The intensity and tightness of their set was admirable, sweeping from upbeat, funky songs to slower, more intimate and intense tracks that pulsated elegantly through the excited crowd.

Guitarist Dustin from Goodbye Brighton. Credit: Cerys Kenneally
Guitarist Dustin from Goodbye Brighton. Credit: Cerys Kenneally

“Devil In My Eyes” was one of many standout tracks. Mia’s voice projected an unexpected vocal range onto the fixed crowd, drenching the audience in a glistening coat of admiration for the headline act. The guitars swept in and out of blues-y tones to a more jazzy, intricate melody that built up to a robust chorus, leading to the crowd becoming engulfed in their funky sound.

Goodbye Brighton from the crowd. Credit: Cerys Kenneally
Goodbye Brighton from the crowd. Credit: Cerys Kenneally

The 45-minute set was practically faultless and goosebump-worthy. The vast vocal range and sophisticated sound complimented their soul-infused set, and undoubtedly hypnotised the crowd. Goodbye Brighton gave a powerful performance worth remembering, that’s for sure.

 

RYP Recordings also donated a stunning €250 to the French Red Cross following the horrific events of last week, uniting the collaborative and admirable focus of the crowd, producing an unforgettable night at The Monarch in Camden.

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