International Day to End Impunity for Crimes Against Journalists

Journalists around the world unite on November 2nd to fight for justice against the criminals who silence journalists by killing them.

By removing the person who has gained access to any type of evidence before it is distributed to the media, it lets criminal organisations to keep on pursuing their illicit activities and allows corrupt governments to carry on manipulating their citizens.

These murders have a huge impact on the world since it keeps society blindfolded to the true dangers we live in. With the loss of the journalist, the gatekeeper of information, media outlets are then unable to inform, causing the public to remain ignorant from the truth and forming biased conclusions.

The UNESCO in collaboration with the Mexican authorities have organised an international seminar in Mexico City to discuss identifying the steps to follow as well as concrete measures to strengthen the battle against impunity in the face of crimes and attacks against journalists.

More information available in the video.

Also, the UNESCO website has a section called #TruthNeverDies dedicated to all the lost journalists, showing the information they were investigating that caused their death.

To carry on the fallen journalist’s legacy, the website encourages people to share their findings on every social media platform.

Here are some of the faces that died finding out the truth. Their age, gender and ethnicity did not cause their death but what they stood for did.

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Independent Ecuadorian journalist Henry Reinoso said ‘Journalists should be given the right to spread the truth since this is why we chose this profession. Fausto Valdiviezo is one of those cases that still has not been solved after 6 years. We should be able to uncover all the corruption in the country and not be silenced.’

Words: Bridget Cardenas Pazmino | Video & Editing: Bridget Cardenas Pazmino | Subbing: Ruta Tamulynaite

Featured Image Credit: https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov