Thursday, January 24The Voice of London

Health

Want a different contraceptive pill? “The NHS can’t afford it”

Want a different contraceptive pill? “The NHS can’t afford it”

Health, Investigations, Specials
Contraception is supposed to be free for every man and women through the NHS. With more than 40 options of oral contraceptive pills, why do doctors keep prescribing the same ones? When Laura*, 22, from London, asked her former GP to be put onto a different pill, Yasmin, he told her it wasn’t available in the UK. What he did not know is that she had seen it as one of the options that Superdrug provides, so that statement could not be true. When confronted about it, Laura’s GP said that it “wasn’t up to him” what contraceptive pills were available through the NHS and that if she wanted, they could give her “the same one” by a different manufacturer: Lucette. But Laura did not give in yet. She asked why, if they were the same, she could not get Yasmin. By then, her GP just said:
Trust me, trust me- I’m a doctor

Trust me, trust me- I’m a doctor

Health, News, NHS, UK
You’ve heard of the pay gap and you’ve followed the horrors of the #metoo movement, now get ready for ‘The Health Gap.’ Women and healthcare have always had a tumultuous relationship. Race and poverty come into play when discussing who has it worse in healthcare, however, they are huge conversations on their own.  Throughout history women’s health queries have been ignored, misdiagnosed and dismissed as dramatics. From the Ancient Greeks believing most of women’s pains came from a wandering womb - to the Victorian times, when doctors had a nasty habit of admitting any woman with mysterious pain to mental hospitals, and diagnosing them instead with the metal disorder ‘hysteria’ (Greek for of the uterus). Some argue that the traditional medical system as it stands now, forces women to
Obesity: A growing problem for England

Obesity: A growing problem for England

Health, Investigations, Specials
Almost two-thirds of adults (64%) in England are overweight or obese, a recent study by the NHS has found. The study also found that almost a third (30%) of children aged 2-15 were overweight or obese, with 17% of them who were obese. Tracy Parker, senior dietitian at the British Heart Foundation told the Voice of London that the findings paint a “troubling picture of people living in poor health” due to a range of lifestyle factors, including smoking and an unhealthy diet. She said it is “especially concerning that obese children are more likely to be obese adults”, as this, coupled with “spiralling diabetes rates” could lead to “thousands more people suffering heart attacks and strokes in the coming years." Mrs Parker believes that “greater availability of cheap calorie d
Drugs: abusing more, admitting less

Drugs: abusing more, admitting less

Featured, Health, Lifestyle, UK
New figures report a 5% fall in British youth receiving therapy for drug abuse, though the number of teenagers who use them continues to rise. A recent study conducted by Public Health England suggests that the number of teenagers in treatment for substance dependence has fallen for the ninth consecutive year. More than 15,000 under-18s sought treatment for drug abuse in the period of a year. The numbers represent a 5% decrease compared to the previous year. However, there is evidence of a rise in the number of teenagers using class A drugs. Ian Hamilton, a drug abuse and mental health researcher at the University of York, told The Guardian: “This decline of young people in treatment doesn’t make sense. Young people’s class A drug use is up from 6.8% in 2007 to 8.4% in 2018, and th
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